Kaiserhaus in Baden bei Wien

Description

MYTHOS LUDWIG VAN
Exhibition 9 November 2019 - 20 December 2020

2020 marks 250 years since the birth of Ludwig van Beethoven. But who was this great musician? A genius? A rebel? A myth? Over the last two centuries, Beethoven has become a cult figure - and not just because of his music.

The exhibition at the Kaiserhaus in Baden is aimed at visitors who play Beethoven, but also at those who know him only from hearsay. It applies to all those who love him and those who hate him - or who have hitherto taken Beethoven for a dog. The exhibition at the Kaiserhaus in Baden examines the question of when and under what circumstances the ‘Beethoven myth’ was created and how it has changed over time. For each era created its own Beethoven.

The tour begins at his deathbed, where friends remove masks from the corpse, cut off curls and clothing. It leads into a salon where painters and graphic artists stylize Beethoven as an icon. A ‘mythomat’ can be used to create an image of Beethoven, and a ‘typical’ Beethoven composition can be sampled in a music room. The political Beethoven is just as much a subject of discussion as the nature lover and the musical revolutionary. The tour ends with Beethoven's use in advertising and kitsch:

Entrance fees:
Adults: € 6 / Groups of 10 or more and senior citizens: € 4
Reduced (pupils, students, military conscripts): € 3
Guided tours: Saturday, Sunday and public holidays: 16.00 / Ticket: € 2.50
Families: every first Sunday of the month

Information.: Gabi Fischer, Museums Department of the City of Baden / T 02252 86800-585 / kaiserhaus@baden.gv.at

The Kaiserhaus Baden – an un-imperial residence of the Habsburgs
"I inspected the house we are to occupy, and I must frankly admit to you that I find it both uninhabitable for this year and incapable of a purposeful improvement". Empress Maria Ludovica wrote this sentence to her husband, Emperor Franz I, after she had been shown the new quarters for the annual Sojourns of the imperial family in Baden on 10 June 1813. The protest was fruitless. The Princely Esterhazy Palace, adapted for Nicholas II by the French architect Charles Moreau, became the imperial house.
Franz I had the building bought "for my use" and remained faithful to it until his death.
The house attained world-historical importance during the 1st World War when, in 1917 and 1918, the army high command of the Austro-Hungarian monarchy was stationed in Baden and Emperor Charles I commanded his army from the first floor of the Kaiserhaus. Afterwards the Kaiserhaus fell into a deep slumber.
Today, the revitalized palace shines in new splendour and the imperial apartment on the first floor serves as a sophisticated setting for exhibitions.

 

Location and how to get there